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Director

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Anthony D. Wagner, PhD

Wagner (PhD '97, Stanford) is a Lucie Stern Professor in the Social Sciences and Chair of the Department of Psychology at Stanford University. He is on the board of Stanford's Center for Cognitive and Neurobiological Imaging, is a contributor to the Stanford Program in Neuroscience and Society, and is a faculty affiliate of the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute, Symbolic Systems Program, Human Biology Program, and Stanford Center on Longevity. His research focuses on the psychology and neurobiology of learning, memory, and executive function in young and older adults. In addition to his basic science and translational work, he examines the implications of neuroscience for law (including as a member of the MacArthur Foundation's Research Network on Law and Neuroscience) and the relationship between multitasking and cognition. He is a Reviewing Editor at Cerebral Cortex and serves on several other editorial boards.

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Postdoctoral Fellows

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Jiefeng Jiang, Ph.D.

Jiefeng (PhD' 14, Duke; Advisor: Tobias Egner) is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Wagner Lab with support from the National Research Service Award (awarded by National Institute of Aging). He is interested in cognitive control, learning, memory and their interactions in both young and older adults, as well as patients with psychiatric and neurological disorders. Jiefeng's research methods include lab- and web-based behavioral tests, neuroimaging (fMRI and EEG) and computational modeling. 

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Kevin Madore, Ph.D.

Madore (PhD '17, Harvard) is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Wagner Lab. He is interested in neurocognitive interactions among goal states, attention, and memory in young and older adults. He uses a combination of behavioral, eyetracking (pupillometry), and neural (fMRI, EEG, concurrent EEG-fMRI, TMS) methodsHe is the recipient of a NRSA F32 sponsored by NIA/NIH.

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Ali Trelle, Ph.D.

Ali (PhD '16, Cambridge) is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Wagner Lab. She is interested in the neural mechanisms supporting episodic memory, and how these are affected by aging and Alzheimer's disease. Ali leads the Stanford Aging and Memory Study, a large-scale longitudinal project examining individual differences in episodic memory in older adults. Her research combines structural and functional MRI, PET imaging, and analysis of molecular and genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

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Graduate Students

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Tyler Bonnen

After transferring from Miami-Dade Community College, Tyler studied chemistry and comparative literature at Columbia University. He went on to research fellowships in the Max-Planck Institute in Leipzig, and then in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT. In the Stanford Memory Lab, he uses biologically plausible computational models, neural data, and animal behavior, in order to formalize the relationship between perception and memory. Tyler is an NSF Graduate Student Research Fellow co-advised by Anthony Wagner and Daniel Yamins.

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Corey Fernandez

Corey (B.A. ’12, Columbia) is a Neuroscience PhD Student in the Wagner Lab. She is interested in the processes that organize memory representations into ‘cognitive maps’ that guide future behavior. Her work in the lab combines fMRI, virtual reality navigation tasks, and neural pattern similarity analyses to examine how we integrate new experiences with existing memory representations and flexibly update our knowledge across learning. Corey is a Regina Casper Graduate Research Fellow.  

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Marc Harrison

Marc (B.S. ’14 Cornell) is a Psychology PhD student in the Wagner Lab. He is interested in healthy older adults' ability to encode and retrieve episodic memories. Specifically, he is investigating if individual differences in memory for older adults can be explained through altered encoding and cognitive control neural mechanisms. His work leverages neuroimaging, neuropsychology, and multivariate statistical analysis. 

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Shaw Hsu

Shaw (B.A. ’15, UC Berkeley) is a Biophysics PhD student in the Wagner Lab. He is interested in memory processes and their interactions with selective attention. His work uses a combination of behavioral, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological methods. 

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Anna Khazenzon

Anna (BA '12, Berkeley) is a Psychology PhD candidate in the Wagner Lab. Her interests surround attention and memory. In particular, she studies how individual differences in sustained attention abilities impact the formation of long-term memories. To do so, Anna integrates across behavioral, pupillary, EEG, and fMRI data. Outside of the lab, Anna enjoys experimenting in both the classroom and kitchen. 

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Shao-Fang (Pam) Wang

Shao-Fang (Pam) is a Psychology PhD student in the Wagner Lab. She is interested in how interactions between the cortex and hippocampus contribute to cortical plasticity during learning. She uses lab- and web-based behavioral tests, computational modeling, EEG, and fMRI. Before joining the Wagner Lab, she received her B.S. in Biology from National Taiwan University. Outside the lab, she enjoys hiking, traveling, baking, and cat-sitting.

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Research Staff

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Nicole Corso

Nicole received her MS in Health Psychology from the University of Michigan-Dearborn in 2018. She previously worked in the Psychiatric Affective Neuroimaging Laboratory with Israel Liberzon, MD in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan using fMRI to look at attention networks and emotion regulation neurocircuitry in individuals with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Most recently, she was a member of the Sleep and Chronophysiology Laboratory in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan with J. Todd Arnedt, PhD studying sleep and biological rhythms regulation by measuring brain activity through electroencephalography (EEG) and cognitive-behavioral interventions. Nicole hopes to pursue a PhD in psychology, exploring the connections between physical health and cognitive functioning.

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Madison Hunt

Madison Hunt graduated from UCLA with a B.S. in Cognitive Science in 2018. At UCLA, she was a member of the Rissman Memory Lab where she worked with Andrew Westphal, PhD and Tiffany Chow, PhD on the SEARCH Project. This project focused on finding the relationship between rumination and memory, using behavioral data and fMRI. Madison joined the Wagner Memory Lab in July, 2018.  In the future, Madison hopes to pursue a PhD in Cognitive Psychology. 

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Ayesha Nadiadwala

Ayesha received her B.S in Cognitive Sciences from UC Irvine in 2016. She had the pleasure of working with different mentors at UCI including Dr. Sarah Tune and Salomi Asaridou in Dr. Steve Small's lab in the areas of language through EEG and MRI, and Dr. Michael Lee to graphically illustrate patterns of free recalls in dementia. After graduation, she worked at Dr. Amit Etkin's lab at Stanford where she worked on different brain circuitry projects exploring emotional processing and gained experience with different modalities such as simultaneous EEG-TMS, fMRI, physiological recordings, and behavioral assessments. She joined the Mormino and Wagner laboratories in December 2017 to study healthy aging and dementia through neuroimaging. She wishes to pursue a PhD in neuroscience exploring emotional processing for memory consolidation and retrieval through neuroimaging. Ayesha loves animals and exploring new places and experiences.

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